20 Comments

  1. Ileane
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    Hi Rebecca, I like all of these strategies but #1 hits home with me the most. I started out blogging on free platforms like Blogger and WordPress dot com and people would say that no “serious” blogger uses free platforms. But at the time I was in the discovery phase and I wasn’t even certain that I wanted to stick with it. As time went by I began to grow my community and as I started getting more and more traffic I knew that it was time to move over to self-hosted WordPress. Even then it took me a few months before I invested in a premium theme. I just keep moving little by little and now I can just imagine what’s next for me!
    Rebecca, thanks for introducing me to FlyLady, she’s cute.

    Reply

  2. Rebecca Livermore
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    Ileane, thanks as always for stopping by.

    I SO agree with you in that we have to start off where we are. While I believe that self-hosted WordPress is the way to go, some people aren’t quite ready for it. Either they are intimidated by how to get started with it, or truly don’t have the money for hosting. I wonder at times how many potential bloggers have not gotten started since someone told them they “have” to use a self-hosted option like WordPress.

    Imperfection can really keep people from getting started, so definitely start small, and make improvements as you go!

    Rebecca

    Reply

  3. Cherise Kelley
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    Having a plan is what has helped me the most. My plan of posting every day, even if I only post how much I weigh and what I ate the day before, has kept my blog alive.

    Reply

  4. Rebecca Livermore
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    Cherise, I agree with you on that — a plan has helped me tremendously as well. I do not yet have a super detailed editorial calendar like a lot of people do, but I started off with a commitment to post every Monday. I’ve since upped that to every Monday and Thursday — with Friday as a backup if for some reason I didn’t get one posted on Thursday. Just having a commitment like that can push me to move forward.

    Even having designated days to post helps me more than saying, “once a week.” Having the days set aside of it is burned in my brain, so if I get up on a Monday morning and realize that I don’t have a post going out, I know I need to get a move on and do it.

    I appreciate your comment, Cherise!

    Rebecca

    Reply

  5. Marie Anne
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    I know a lot of people that used to follow FlyLady (don’t know if they still do) and had much success. I never would have thought of applying the same principles to blogging.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Thanks, Marie Anne! I think FlyLady succeeds because she uses principles that are general success principles and because of that, they apply to many things.

      Thanks again for stopping by, MA. I appreciate the comment!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  6. Shawn S. Lealos
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    I am impressed at how you took the ideas of FlyLady and integrated it into blogging. Nice work.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Thanks for stopping by, Shawn, and for your kind words! I think there are lessons that apply to blogging in many places — I’m guessing that is true for most topics as well!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  7. Eric T. Benoit (
    @

    Hi Rebecca, Great info, Thanks!

    Reply

  8. Lana Bandoim
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    These are excellent tips. Baby steps are essential. I have seen too many bloggers try to tackle a dozen blogs at the same time and fail. Start with one and grow.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Lana, I do agree, for sure, that trying to start more than one blog at a time is not a good idea! It takes time to discover your voice and get into a good rhythm with any blog, not to mention that it can be a challenge to consistently come up with blog post ideas and write them regularly. I think it’s really important to be firmly established with one blog before allowing yourself to get distracted with additional blogs.

      Thanks as always for stopping by, Lana!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  9. Amanda Dollak
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    Perfectionism is what kills my writing the most. I have had to learn to turn my inner editor/critic off until after I’ve finished writing a piece. And I’ve also learned to be much more lenient with myself. If I attempt too hard to make something perfect, I can hardly write and then I often feel the finished product is artificial and cold.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      I can really relate to the perfectionism thing, Amanda. One of the things that helped me the most with this is that one of my clients, who is very successful, just launched something new, and it was imperfect! They did it anyway, and it was well received. Not that we shouldn’t try to produce quality content — we should — but waiting until you know more or have more time, or trying to find the perfect photo to go with the post or whatever else — all of those things just keep the darn thing from being written, and really don’t do you any good.

      I look forward to reading more of your blog posts, Amanda, so don’t you dare let perfectionism keep you from writing!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  10. Donna Merrill
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    Hi Rebecca, Good advice to the blogger. I especially like #5 because I know so many people who avoid blogging because they think they have to be perfect. Lets face it, no on is, and if so, the blog probably would be boring!
    Giving good content is the key, but we need to put our own unique personalities into it as well.
    Great post!
    Donna Merrill

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Donna, the thing I love most in what you wrote is,

      Lets face it, no on is [perfect], and if so, the blog probably would be boring!

      .

      So true! Quality is important, but we are all human and as soon as we admit that to ourselves and allow others to see it as well, it frees us up to create our best content!

      Thanks as always for your comment, Donna. I appreciate it!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  11. Caroline
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    I have to say #5 for me. I’m not perfect and early on I hated posting for fear of making a mistake. Was much easier when I realized it’s okay to just let it go.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Caroline, it seems that #5 resonated with a lot of people, which shows how many of us (myself included) have struggled with perfectionism. It’s amazing how much more we can accomplish when we let go of fears of failure and/or making mistakes, and just DO IT. I’m really thankful that you and I are both growing in this area, because I know it will make all the difference in the world in our blogging success.

      Thanks as always for your support, Caroline!

      Rebecca

      Reply

  12. Chuck
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    I like #2 (Having a Plan) the best. It is hard to be consistent if you just write when you feel like. But if I try to make sure I post at least once a week, I do. Some weeks are really busy (like this one), but if I have a goal of at least one post per week, I’m more apt to actually do it than if I was just writing when I feel like writing.

    Reply

    • Rebecca Livermore
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      Chuck, I think it’s a great idea to have a realistic goal such as posting once a week as part of your plan. It is amazing how much time can slip by without any action if you don’t have a plan in place.

      Thanks as always for stopping by!

      Reply

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